Subjects and Entry Requirements

It is expected that all students will achieve a minimum of 3 grades at A* – C and Grade 4 in GCSE English and Maths to study Level 3 Courses. Students not meeting this requirement and/or don’t meet the individual course entry requirements will meet with a member of the sixth form team to discuss possible course pathways that may combine Level 2, Level 3 and resit Maths and English.

Sixth Form staff will monitor your progress carefully. If you have not met the admission requirements, you can discuss any resits or course changes that may be necessary. However, your Sixth Form options may still be possible, even if you have not met the entry requirements.

AS & Course Information Booklet
To find out more information about the courses on offer and their entry requirements.

You can also download a copy here: course-information-booklet

KS5 Assessment Programmes
BTEC Applied Science
Fine Art
Business Studies
Chemistry
Computing
Dance
Digital Photography
Biology
Drama
English
Health And Social
History
Maths
Music
PE
Psychology
Travel & Tourism

 


BTEC Applied Science

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
Autumn TermUnit 1 – Principles and Applications of Science 1
A Periodicity and Properties of Elements
A1 Structure and bonding in applications in Science
• Electronic structure of atoms
• Ionic bonding
• Covalent bonding
• Metallic bonding
• Molecular forces
• Quantities used in chemical reactions
C Waves in Communication
C1 Working with waves
• Features common to all waves
• Graphical representation of wave features
• Difference between transverse and longitudinal waves
• Key concepts applied to diffraction gratings
• Industrial application of diffraction gratings
• Use the wave equation
• Understand stationary waves resonance
• Musical instruments
• Speed equation
C2 waves in communication
• Fibre optics

Unit 2 – Practical Scientific procedure and Techniques
• A – Undertake titration and colorimetry to determine the concentration of solutions
• B Undertake calorimetry to study cooling curves
Mid Term Exam
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Assessed learning Aim A -Undertake titration and colorimetry to determine the concentration of solutions assignment
Spring TermUnit 1 – Principles and Applications of Science 1

A Periodicity and Properties of Elements
A2 Production and uses of substances in relation to properties
• Periodic table
• Physical properties of elements
• Chemical properties of elements
C3 Use of Electromagnetic Waves in Communication
• Speed of waves
• Use the inverse square law for intensity of a wave
• Frequency and waves and applications
B Structures and functions of cells and tissues
B1 Cell structure and function
• Structure, function and organisation in all living organisms
• Ultrastructure of cell organelles
• Cell organelles under light / electron microscopes
• Animal and plant cells
• Gram positive / gram negative bacteria
• Magnification
B3 Tissue Structure and Function
• Epithelial tissue
• Endothelial tissue
• Muscular tissue

Unit 2 – Practical Scientific procedure and Techniques
• B Undertake calorimetry to study cooling curves
• C Undertake chromatographic techniques to identify components in mixtures
Jan PPE Exams: Principles & Applications of Science 1hr30 – 50%
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Assessed Learning Aim B -Undertake calorimetry to study cooling curves assignment
Assessed learning Aim C -Undertake chromatographic techniques to identify components in mixtures assignment
Summer TermUnit 1 – Principles and Applications of Science 1
B Structures and functions of cells and tissues
B2 Cell Specialisation
B3 Tissue Structure and Function
• Nervous tissue

Unit 2 – Practical Scientific procedure and Techniques
• D Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work
End of Year Exams: Principles & Applications of Science 1hr30 – 50%
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Assessed learning Aim D Review personal development of scientific skills for laboratory work assignment

The components for the final assessment grade are as follows:

50% Exam
50% Assignments

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Completion of teaching leading assessment of Unit 32, assignment 1: “Collection of evidence”. Covering P1M1D1. The students look at the necessary basic H&S connected to Crime scene investigation. They look at the different types of crimes that can occur and how they would deal with the situation and the possible evidence.
Completion of Assessment 1: Collection of Evidence. The students have to create an information document detailing different collection methods and how they would handle the evidence they collected to prevent contamination.
AP2Completion of teaching leading up to the assessment of Unit 32 assignment 2&3 “Portfolio of techniques” and “Analysis of evidence”. P2-7,M2-7,D2-7. This involves looking at the correct procedure when entering a crime scene and how to apply different search techniques. It also looks at the different analytical techniques that can be applied to different pieces of evidence.

The assessment of these 2 assignment briefs are completed simultaneously. The students have to complete an assessed (simulated) crime scene walk-through and decide what constitutes evidence and how the evidence is collected and transported. All of this is done to ensure integrity of the evidence.
The students have to be constantly generating their own write up of the collection methods they used, the analytical techniques they used and their results. They then use these results in the last assignment brief to conclude and present their findings.
AP3As AP2As AP2
AP4Completion of the teaching leading up to assignment brief 4: “Crime scene to court”. P8M8D8. The students look at how evidence is presented in court and how the wording that they use is important as they are generating a lot of circumstantial evidence that is presented.
For the assessment of this assignment brief , the students create a power point presentation of their findings, then using Explain everything app, they record their presentation videos for assessment.
AP5Time is allocated to the completion of BFS/MSF assignment briefs

The components for the final assessment grade are as follows:

50% Exam
50% Assignments

 


Fine Art

Year 12

 Curriculum content:
TEACHER LED PROJECT Development of skills, techniques and processes
Assessed work:
Portfolio Sketchbook Finished outcomes Final Exhibition
AP1Development of ideas linked to London and local gallery visits Sketchbook research to include recording , initial investigations, cultural, contemporary and historical artists linked to theme
Recording in visual and other forms
Sketchbook development
Recording gallery visit[s] evidenced
Direct observation drawing
Photography
AP2Exploring materials, techniques and processes
Print workshop
Etchings and prints
Portfolio review 1 interim marking
AP3Realising intentions
Final outcomes/ finished pieces
Final outcome planning in sketchbook
Finished pieces as canvas /print /models/ sculptures /installations Portfolio review 2 addressing all 4 assessment objectives
AP4Externally set assignmentPre Public Exam major drawing 5 hours
Exam preparatory studies/mounted sheets/composition planning
AP5Exam
Final Exhibition/private view
5 hours Exam outcome internally marked MAY and externally moderated JUNE

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

50% exam (from Sept 2015 40%)

50% controlled assessment/classwork tasks (from Sept 2015 60%)

Year 13

 Curriculum content:
PERSONAL INVESTIGATION
Practical portfolio supported by a written personal study devised by student on a theme/concept /issue
Assessed work:
Portfolio
Sketchbook Finished outcomes Final Exhibition
AP1Development of ideas linked to London and local gallery visits Sketchbook research to include recording, initial investigations, cultural, contemporary and historical artists linked to personal theme nRecording in visual and other formsDigital presentationnSketchbook development
Recording gallery visit[s] evidenced
Direct observation drawing and Photography
Portfolio review 1
AP2Critical study Written study 1000 -3000 words with reports on gallery visits, evaluations, personal reflections and bibliographynExploring materials, techniques and processesPersonal study containing aim/chapters /conclusion and bibliography
Sketchbook development
Prints
Portfolio review 2
AP3Realising intentions
Final outcomes/ finished pieces
Final outcome planning in sketchbook
Finished outcomes as canvas/print/models/sculptures/installation
Portfolio review 3 addressing all 4 assessment objectives
AP4Externally set assignmentPre Public Exam major drawing 5 hours
Exam preparatory studies/mounted sheets/composition planning
AP5Exam
Final Exhibition/private view
15 hour Exam outcome internally marked MAY and externally moderated JUNE

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

50% exam (from Sept 2015 40%)

50% controlled assessment/classwork tasks (from Sept 2015 60%)


Business Studies

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Market analysis, market planning and market strategy.
Financial accounts, Ratio analysis and Investment Appraisal
Weekly homework which is linked to a past exam question
AP2Human Resource Management, Employee and Employer Relations.
Lean production, Critical path Analysis and Economies of Scale
Weekly homework which is linked to a past exam question
A PPE will be sat at the end of December
AP3Research task -manufacturing in the UK, Essays 1 - 3
3 Essays based on the research task.
A further PPE based on Unit 3 content
AP4Research task ‘manufacturing in the UK’, Essays 4-5

2 Essays based on the research task.
PPE on unit 3 and 4
AP5Essays on Leadership, Culture and Corporate Social responsibility
3 Essays

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
100% exam

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Managing an event
The food industry
Unit 18 – pass tasks
Unit 32 – pass, merit and distinction tasks
AP2Working in teams
Fashion retail
Unit 19 – pass tasks
Unit 32 – pass, merit and distinction tasks
AP3Career planning
Health and safety
Unit 15 – merit and distinction tasks
Unit 27 – pass and merit tasks
AP4Evaluating the management of an event
Health and safety
Unit 18 – merit and distinction tasks
Unit 27 – merit and distinction tasks
AP5Evaluating working in teams
Unit 19 – merit and distinction tasks

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
100% controlled assessment


Chemistry

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemsitry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 2 – Foundations in Chemistry
• Atoms, compounds, molecules and equations
• Amount of substance
• Acid–base and redox reactions
• Electrons, bonding and structure
Maths Skills
Mid Term exam
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SpringModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 3 – Periodic table and energy
• The periodic table and periodicity
• Group 2 and the halogens
• Qualitative analysis
• Enthalpy changes
• Reaction rates and equilibrium (qualitative)
Maths Skills
Jan PPE Exams:
Breadth in Chemistry 70 marks 1hr 30 –50%
Depth in Chemistry 70 marks 1hr 30 – 50%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SummerModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• Evaluation
Module 4 – Core organic chemistry
• Basic concepts
• Hydrocarbons
• Alcohols and haloalkanes
• Organic synthesis
• Analytical techniques (IR and MS)

Maths Skills
End of Year Exams:
Breadth in Chemistry 70 marks 1hr 30 –50%
Depth in Chemistry 70 marks 1hr 30 – 50%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
The components for the final assessment grade are as follows:
100% Exam
Practical Endorsement in Chemistry (no exam assessment)

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 5 – Physical chemistry and transition Elements
• Reaction rates and equilibrium (quantitative)
• pH and buffers
• Enthalpy, entropy and free energy
• Redox and electrode potentials
• Transition elements
Maths Skills
Mid Term Exam
Factual Recall Tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SpringModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 6 – Organic chemistry and analysis
• Aromatic compounds
• Carbonyl compounds
• Carboxylic acids and esters
• Nitrogen compounds
• Polymers
• Organic synthesis
• Chromatography and spectroscopy (NMR)
Maths Skills
Jan PPE Exams:
Periodic table, elements and physical chemistry 100 marks 2 hours 15 minutes 37%
Synthesis and analytical techniques 100 marks 2 hours 15 minutes 37%
Unified chemistry 70 marks 1 hour 30 minutes 26%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SummerModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Chemistry
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• Evaluation
Interleaving Yr12 / 13 content
Review of Modules 2, 3 and 4
Maths Skills
End of Year Exams:
Periodic table, elements and physical chemistry 100 marks 2 hours 15 minutes 37%
Synthesis and analytical techniques 100 marks 2 hours 15 minutes 37%
Unified chemistry 70 marks 1 hour 30 minutes 26%

Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
The components for the final assessment grade are as follows:
100% Exam
Practical Endorsement in Chemistry (no exam assessment)


Dance

Drama Poster 2 Georgia

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Introduction to Dancer in Training (basic KNW) Unit 1 DANC1
Choreography : Craft and Process of Unit 2 DANC2
Professional works: Appreciation of Unit 1 DANC1
Practical Technical Skills Internally Assessed (Ongoing) Unit 1 (to support Unit 2)
Workshop Presentation Practical and theory written Unit 1 (videoed/PowerPoint)
AP2Working through the D.I.T textbook/Revision Booklet (independent Learning) Anatomy and Technical Skills Unit 1 DANC1
Performance Skills Unit 2 DANC2
Practical Unit 2 DANC2 Practise and Assess Solo choreography practise (choreographic skills videoed) and if applicable Performance in a Duo/Trio ance Drama DANC2 (performance Skills)
Written Unit 1 Section A practise questions papers assessed internally
AP3Research, experimentation, improvisation, manipulation Unit 1 and 2 DANC1 & 2
Professional works analysis of movement/physical setting revision books worked on. DANC1
Practical Skills Duo/Trio and solo choreography assess choice of solo question from AQA pre release paper.
Unit 2 Internal Moderation (videoed) solo and duo/trio and written feedback given.
Written Unit 1 Section B essay practise papers (ongoing assessment)
AP4Dance in Training - Diet health environment physiological Choreography form and structure.
Professional works themes and analysis knowledge and understanding compare and contrast.
Written Unit 1 PPE DANC1
Practical Unit 2 pre for exam moderation
Practical Unit 2 DANC2 Exam Internal Moderation March to May
AP5Unit 1 DANC1 prep for exam secure all knowledge in 3 areas review D.I.T/Craft and Process/Professional works
A2 preparation for Area of Study and set work
Student voice
Group choreography practise
Practical Unit 2 Review DANC2 into DANC4 - solo to be used for Group choreography practise. (internally assesses - Videoed)
Written Unit 1 Exam (June)

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
2 exams, 1 practical (60%) and 1 written (40%)
Classwork tasks and presentation/performances

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Intro to Set Work - SW - and Background Knowledge of Practitioner.
Intro to Area of Study - AOS (student voice determines these two aspects) Unit 3 DANC3
Practical work on the practitioners from both areas Unit 4 DANC4
Presentation of Background knowledge of 3 practitioners (AOS)
PowerPoint/practical choice Unit 3 DANC3
Assessed home learning of SW - HL tasks Written DANC3
AP2Prepration of practitioners style for Unit 4 solo DANC4 workshops and exemplar work to be reviewed
Knowledge of impact of AOS and understanding of Context and Content
Practical assessment in Dance Drama of SW and AOS practitioners to inform solos and embed knowledge of style for unit 3 and 4 DANC3 and DANC4
AP3Research Experimentation, improvisation and manipulation
Unit 4 DANC4 group choreography choice of dancers
Choreographic skills work shopped in lessons managing rehearsals
Assess choice of question and suitability of dancers Unit 4 DANC4 (videoed & written feedback given)
Assess choice of solo practitioner and assess practical skills (videoed)
DANC4
AP4Practical work on choreographic/performance and movement style of the practitioner chosen DANC4
Professional works seen and analysed for DANC3 AOS
Group work if applicable in class/own time
Written Unit 3 PPE DANC3
Practical Unit 4 pre for exam moderation
Practical Unit 4 DANC4 Exam Internal Moderation March to May
AP5Unit 3 DANC3 prep for exam secure all knowledge in Area of Study and Set Work view professional worksWritten Unit 3 DANC3 Exam (June)

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
2 exams, 1 practical (25%) and 1 written (25%) (Percentages are of A Level)
Classwork tasks and presentation/performances


Digital Photography

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Initial planning and early coursework developments - photographsInitial photographs and edits
Reflection upon planning
AP2Further coursework developments. Extended photographs, editing of photographs.Reflection on planning
AP3Creative outcomes in photography - for example collage, mini-theatre and sculpturePPE - outcome
AP4Exam planningInitial Exam research
AP5ExamExam - 5 hours

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
40% exam
60% coursework controlled assessment/classwork tasks

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Initial planning of coursework and early photographsInitial outcomes and edits
AP2Further development of courseworkReflection on planning and coursework outcomes
AP3Creative outcomes in photographyPPE - outcome
AP4Exam planningInitial Exam research and planning
AP5ExamExam - 15 hours

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
40% exam
60% coursework controlled assessment/classwork tasks


Biology

Year 12

TermCurriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 2 Cell, chemicals for Life, transport and gas exchange
• Cells and microscopy
• Water and its importance in plants and animals
• Proteins and enzymes
• Nucleic acids
• Heart and monitoring heart function
• Transport systems in mammals
• Gas exchange in plants
Maths Skills
Mid Term exam
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SpringModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation

Module 3 Cell Division, Development and Disease Control
• The developing cell: cell division and cell differentiation
• The developing individual: meiosis, growth and development
• The development of species: evolution and classification
• Pathogenic microorganisms
Maths Skills
Jan PPE Exams:
Foundations of Biology 70 marks 1hr 30 –50%
Biology in Depth 70 marks 1hr 30 – 50%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SummerModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• Evaluation

Module 3 Cell Division, Development and Disease Control
• The immune system
• Controlling communicable disease
• The cellular basis of cancer and treatment
• Respiratory diseases and treatment
Maths Skills
End of Year Exams:
Foundations of Biology 70 marks 1hr 30 –50%
Biology in Depth 70 marks 1hr 30 – 50%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

100% Exam
Practical Endorsement in Biology (no exam assessment)

Year 13

TermCurriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 4 Energy, Reproduction & Populations
• Cellular respiration
• Metabolism & exercise
• Fertility and assisted reproduction
• The effects of ageing on the reproductive system
• Photosynthesis, food production and management of the environment
• The impact of population increase
Module 5 Genetics, Control and Homeostasis
• Patterns of inheritance
• Population genetics and epigenetics
• The nervous system and the identification and consequences of damage
Maths Skills
Mid Term Exam
Factual Recall Tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SpringModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• evaluation
Module 4 Energy, Reproduction & Populations
• Plant reproduction
Module 5 Genetics, Control and Homeostasis
• Gene technologies
• Monitoring visual function
• Ageing nervous system
• Principles & importance of homeostasis
• Blood glucose & diabetes
• Kidney functions & malfunctions
Maths Skills
Jan PPE Exams:
Fundamentals of Biology 110 marks 2hr 15 41%
Scientific Literacy in Biology 100marks 2hr15 37%
Practical Skills in Biology 60 marks 1hr30 22%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills
SummerModule 1 Development of Practical Skills in Biology
• Planning
• Implementing
• Analysis
• Evaluation
Interleaving Yr12 / 13 content
Maths Skills
End of Year Exams:
Fundamentals of Biology 110 marks 2hr 15 41%
Scientific Literacy in Biology 100marks 2hr15 37%
Practical Skills in Biology 60 marks 1hr30 22%
Factual Recall tests
Past Papers / Exam Practice
Scientific PAG activities to develop practical skills

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

100% Exam
Practical Endorsement in Biology (no exam assessment)


Drama

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 1 Exploration of 2 play texts ( x 1 practical hour recorded) x 6 hours practical x 23000 words (controlled assessment
AP2Unit 1 Exploration of 2 play texts ( x 1 practical hour recorded) x 6 hours practical x 2+ 12 hours practical exploration
AP3Unit 2 Monologues/duologues
Directed piece (teacher to direct)
Externally assessed
AP4Unit 2 Live Theatre Review1000 words controlled assessment
AP5Unit 2 The monologue/duologue and direct pieces are usually completed to an examiner in May and their written concepts (500words) are also externally marked

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
Unit 1 – 40% – internally assessed
Unit 2 – 60% – Externally assessed

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 4 Exploration of Woyzeck – German Play by Georg BuchnerPerformance Showcase Evening (October)
AP2Unit 3 DevisedExternally assessed.
(Practical)
AP3Unit 3 Devised and WoyzeckExternally assessed.
(Practical)
AP4Unit 4 Theatre Text in contextExternal Exam paper
AP5Unit (Shakespeare and Woyzeck)External Exam paper

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
Unit 3 – 40% – internally assessed
Unit 4 – 60% – Externally assessed (EXAM) 2hrs 30mins


English

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnOthello and Death of Salesman and the conventions of tragedy.
Test: Q1 Paper 1A: Othello question
SpringThe Great Gatsby and poetry anthology.
Test (Spring 1): Paper 1A: Othello and Death of A Salesman
Test (Spring 2): Paper 2A: The Great Gatsby and poetry anthology.
SummerExam practice and introduction to literary theories (Marxism, Feminism, post colonialism)
Test: formal AS exam and submission of first draft of NEA.

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnWilliam Blake and A Doll’s house and conventions of political and social protest writing.
Revision of Othello
The Kite Runner.
Test: Paper 2B: William Blake and A Doll’s house (Section A)
SpringPreparation for Paper 2b (A Doll’s House, William Blake and The Kite Runner).
Revision of Othello, Death of a Salesman and Poetry Anthology.
Spring 1 PPE: Paper 2b.
Spring 2 PPE: Paper 1a and 2b.
SummerExam preparation.


Health And Social

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 1-
Growth and development, milestones.
Conception, foetal development, developmental delays.
Key theorists related to development.
Development in infancy.
Unit 5-
Factual tests
Past paper questions
PPE UNIT 1
AP2Unit 1-
Socialisation and peer pressure, adolescence and puberty.
Holistic development in adulthood and later adulthood
Nature/nurture and related theorists
Factors affecting development
Life events
Unit 5-
Factual tests
Past paper questions
Revision aid nature/nurture and theorists
AP3Unit 1-
Effects of aging -PIES
Recap of unit and exam expectations
Exam practice
Unit 5-
PPE UNIT 1

External exam unit 1

The course is 100% controlled assessment

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 2 –Terminology with regard to equality and diversity
Individuals rights/care values
Unit 4 –Overview of life stages, life expectancy, expected and unexpected life events.
Unit 11 – What is abuse and overview of types of abuse?
Unit 2 – Case study diversity issues within a care home

Unit 4 –Review of an individual’s life course identifying predictable and un predictable life events.
Unit 11 –Case studies on identifying abuse and actions to take as a carer.
AP2Unit 2 – equality, diversity and rights
Unit 4 –Development through life stages
Unit 11- Forms of abuse that may be experienced by adults
Unit 2 – P1
Unit 4 –P1
Unit 11 – P1
AP3Unit 2- discriminatory practice in Health and Social Care and its effects.
Unit 4 – Effects of life factors on development
Unit 11- Indicators of abuse in adults
Unit 2 – P2, P3,M1

Unit 4 –P2, M1, D1
Unit 11 – P2, M1, D1
AP4Unit 2 – How national initiatives promote anti-discrimination
Unit 4 – Influences of predictable and unpredictable events
Unit 11 – Legislation to safeguard adults and strategies used to reduce the risk of abuse.
Unit 2 – P4, M2, D1

Unit 4- P3, M2
Unit 11 – P4,P5, M2
AP5Unit 2 – How anti-discriminatory practice is promotes.
Unit 4 – Theory of aging and psychological changes
Unit 11 – The role of supportive relationships to reduce the risk of abuse and neglect.
Unit 2 – P5, M3,D2
Unit 4 – P4,P5,M3,D2
Unit 11- P6, M3, D2

The course is 100% controlled assessment


History

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnAS Paper 1 – Stuart Britain: Absolutism Challenged, Britain 1603-1649
• Monarchs & Parliament 1603-29


AS Paper 2 – Germany: The Weimar Republic, 1918-33
The establishment and early years of Weimar 1918-24
Exam Questions:
• The Courts of James and Charles
• The relationship between the Crown and Parliament

Exam questions –
• Was the German revolution a failure?
• Threats to Weimar stability
(The Constitution/The Treaty of Versailles/Economic crises)

Knowledge tests

SpringAS Paper 1 – Stuart Britain: Absolutism Challenged, Britain 1603-1649
• Monarchs & Parliament 1603-29




AS Paper 2 – Germany: The Weimar Republic, 1918-33
• The establishment and early years of Weimar 1918-24
• The Golden Age of Weimar 1924-28

Revision of Papers 1 and 2
Exam Questions:
• The Long and Short Parliaments
• The outbreak of Civil War
• Exam Questions: AP1 topics (interleaving)

Knowledge tests

Exam question:
• Were the years 1924-29 a ‘golden age’?

Knowledge tests

PPE exam:
• A Question from Paper 1 (25 marks)
• A Question from Paper 2 (25 marks)

SummerAS Paper 1 – Stuart Britain: Absolutism Challenged, Britain 1603-1649
• Revolution 1629-1649
• Revision for PPE



AS Paper 2 – Germany: The Weimar Republic, 1918-33
• The collapse of democracy 1928-33
• Revision for PPE
Exam Questions:
• Reasons for the Royalist defeat
• Reasons for Regicide
• Exam Questions: AP1-3 (interleaving)

Exam question:
• Causes of Nazi rise to power
• AP1-3 (interleaving)

PPE exams
• Paper 1 – 1 hour 30 minutes (50%)
• Paper 2 – 1 hour 30 minutes (50%)
After AS exams
A Level Paper 1 – Stuart Britain: Absolutism Challenged, Britain 1603-1649
• From Republic to restored monarchy, 1649-1678

A Level Paper 2 – Germany: The Weimar Republic, 1918-33
• The Nazi Dictatorship, 1933-39
• Exam question




• Exam question – Hitler’s consolidation of power

2 examinations. Unit 1 – Civil Rights & Vietnam & Korea, Unit 2 – Status of Women

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnPaper 3 – Ireland and the Union

• Breadth study 1 – Irish nationalism: from agitation to civil war
• Breadth study 2 – British reaction: from resistance to acceptance
• Depth study 1 – Towards emancipation, 1774-1830
• Depth study 2 – Industrialisation in Ulster, 1825-55

Paper 3 – Ireland and the Union

• Breadth study 1 – exam question
• Breadth study 2 – exam question
• Depth study 1 – exam question
• Depth study 2 – exam question

Year 12 AS result also taken into account when working out predicted grades for AP1
SpringPaper 3 – Ireland and the Union

• Depth study 3 – The Irish Famine, 1843-51
• Depth study 4 – The Irish land issue, 1870-82
• Depth study 5 – Trades Union militancy 1907-14
• PPE Revision of Paper 1 (America 1917-96), Paper 2 (South Africa) & Paper 3 (Ireland)


Paper 3 – Ireland and the Union

• Depth study 3 – exam question
• Depth study 4 – exam question
• Depth study 5 – exam question

AP2 calculated through PPEs – Papers 1, 2 & 3
• Paper 1 (America 1917-96)
• Paper 2 (South Africa 1948-1994)
• Paper 3 (Ireland 1774-1923)

SummerCoursework completed

Revision of Papers 1, 2 and 3
PPEs – Papers 1, 2 & 3
• Paper 1 (America 1917-96) – 30%
• Paper 2 (South Africa 1948-1994) – 20%
• Paper 3 (Ireland 1774-1923) – 30%
• Coursework – 20%


Computing

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1The Information Age Unit 1• One Unit of assessed classroom learning
AP2The Information Age Unit 1• One Unit of assessed classroom learning
AP3The Digital Economy Unit 2• One Unit of assessed classroom learning
AP4Unit 3 The Knowledge Worker Exam• Public Exam
AP5Unit 3 The Knowledge Worker Exam• Public Exam

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

Unit 3: exam
Unit 1 and Unit 2 are Controlled Assessment/Classwork tasks

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 8 + 10 Managing ICT Projects• Managing ICT Projects + Using Multimedia Software
• 2 Units of assessed classroom learning
AP2Unit 8 + 10 Managing ICT Projects• Managing ICT Projects + Using Multimedia Software
• 2 Units of assessed classroom learning
AP3Unit 8 + 10 Managing ICT Projects• Managing ICT Projects + Using Multimedia Software
• 2 Units of assessed classroom learning
AP4Unit 7 Using Database Software Exam• Public Exam
AP5Unit 7 Using Database Software Exam• Public Exam

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

Unit 7: exam
Unit 8 + 10 controlled assessment/classwork tasks

Each unit for both Yr 12 and 13 are equally weighted


Maths

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Core 1:Basic algebra, Polynomials,
Coordinate Geometry, Differentiation.
Statistics 1: Numerical Measurers, Probability.
Targets in place.
Skills practise homework
AP2Core 1: Further Differentiation, Integration
Statistics 1: Binomial Distribution, Normal
Distribution, Estimation
Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning
Mini topic test
AP3Core 2: Transformation of functions,
Trigonometry.
Statistics 1: Correlation and Regression
Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning
Past paper home learning
Past Core 1 exam
AP4Core 2: Differentiation, Integration, Sequences & Series, Indices & Logarithms Past paper home learning
Skills practise homework
Past Core 1 exam
Past Statistics 1 exam
AP5Review, reflect and practise for Core 1, Core 2 and Statistics 1 exams. Past paper home learning
Skills practise homework
Past Core 1 & 2 exam, Statistic 1
AP6Core 3: Differentiation
Decision: Graphs and Networks,
Minimum Spanning Tree,
Shortest Path (Dijkstra)
Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Core 3: Trigonometric Functions, Integration,
Functions
Decision: Route Inspection, Travelling
Salesman, Matching,
Linear Programming,
Sorting,
Algorithms.
Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning
Past Decision 1 paper
AP2Core 3: Exponentials & Logarithms,
Numerical methods.
Core 4: Algebra & Functions,
Trigonometry & Compound Angles,

Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning
Past paper home learning
Past Core 3 exam
AP3Core 4: Vectors,
Further Calculus,
Past paper questions
Skills practise home learning
Past paper home learning
Past Core 4 exam
AP4Core 4: Exponential Models,
Binomial Series.

Review, reflect & practise for Core 3 & 4 and Decision 1.
Past paper home learning
Past papers in class
AP5Exam preparation for Core 3 & 4 and Decision 1Past paper home learning
Past papers in class


Music

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 23: Music Performance Techniques
LO1 – Presentation and Target Setting; Introduce Diary
LO2 – Solo Performance (Practice)
LO3 – Group Performance (Practice)
Unit 21: Music in the Community
LO1 – Community Music Information Pack Essay
LO2 – Music Making Workshop
Unit 23: Music Performance Techniques: LO1- Presentation
AP2Unit 21: Music in the Community
LO3 – Community Music Project
LO4 – Assessing the Project
Unit 21: Music in the Community: LO3: Community Music Project
AP3Unit 23: Music Performance Techniques
LO1 – Submit Diary
LO2 – Solo Performance (Actual)
LO3 – Group Performance (Actual)
Distinction
AP4Unit 33: Solo Music Performance Skills
LO1 – Choose pieces for performance
Unit 33: Solo Music Performance Skills – LO1 – Choose Pieces
AP5Unit 33: Solo Music Performance Skills
LO2 – Solo Performance
LO3 – Essay – How Did The Performance Go?
Final Predicted Grade for Year 12

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
100% controlled assessment/classwork tasks

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 43: Special Subject Investigation
LO1 – Subject Choice
LO2 – Research Proposal
(LO1 and 2 are done as a presentation)
Unit 30: Pop Music in Practice
LO1 – History of Popular Music from 1950s Essay
LO2 – How Music Developed Essay
Unit 43: Special Subject Investigation: LO1 and LO2: Presentation
AP2Unit 43: Special Subject Investigation
LO3 and LO4 - Scrapbook
Unit 30: Pop Music in Practice
LO3 – Start to write 4 original songs
LO4 – Start to create 4 performances
Unit 30: Pop Music in Practice: LO1: History of Pop Music Essay
AP3Unit 30: Pop Music in Practice
LO3- Perform 4 original songs
LO4 – Perform 4 songs from 1950-2014
Unit 30: Pop Music in Practice: LO4: Performance of 4 songs
AP4Unit 43: Special Subject Investigation
LO5 – Special Subject essay
Unit 36:Studying Music From Around the World
LO1- Cultures Presentation
LO2 – Radio Programme
Unit 43: Special Subject Investigation: Special Subject Essay
AP5Unit 36:Studying Music From Around the World
LO3 – Creation of CD
LO4 – Two Compositions
Final Predicted Grade for Year 13

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:
100% controlled assessment/classwork tasks


PE

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP11. Classification of Motor Skills
• Muscular involvement (gross – fine);
• Environmental influence (open – closed);
• Continuity (discrete – serial – continuous);
• Pacing (externally paced – self paced);
• Difficulty (simple - complex);
• Organisation (low – high).

2. The Application of Classification to the Organisation & Determination of Practice
• Describe methods of manipulating skills (part and whole practice; progressive part and whole-part or whole) to facilitate learning and improve performance.
• Evaluate critically these methods & their effectiveness in the learning of movement skills.

3. Classification of Abilities Relating to Movement Skills
• Characteristics of ability (innate, underlying and enduring traits).
• Gross motor abilities with examples.
• Psychomotor abilities with examples.

4. Phases/Stages of Movement Skill Learning That Affect Participation & Performance in Physical Activity
• Identify characteristics of the phases of learning (Fitts & Posner)& Apply these phases of learning to practical activities
• Cognitive
• Associative
• Autonomous

5. Types of Guidance & Their Impact on Effective Performance & Participation in a Balanced, Active & Healthy Lifestyle
• Describe types of guidance used in different phases of learning to improve performance: (Visual – early phase; verbal – later phases; manual & mechanical – developing kinaesthetic awareness & knowledge of safety issues).
• Evaluate critically these different types of guidance.

6. Practice Methods & Their Impact on Effective & Efficient Performance of Movement Skills
• Describe methods of physical practice (massed; distributed; fixed; varied).
• Explain the role of mental practice & rehearsal vs. physical practice & rehearsal.
• Explain the appropriate use of practice methods to maximise effectiveness (for different ability levels & for different activities; classification of skills; schema theory).
• Evaluate critically different types of practice methods & their application to the performance of movement skills.

7. Models of Information Processing & Effectiveness in the Learning & Performance of Movement Skills
• Describe Welford’s Model (display, sensory information, sense organs, perceptual mechanism, effector mechanism, response and feedback);
• Describe Whiting’s Model (display, receptor systems, perceptual mechanism, translatory mechanisms, output, feedback)
• Apply these models to the learning & performance of physical activities.

8. Memory & it’s Role in Developing Movement Skills
• Describe the Multi-store model of the memory process; short-term sensory stores (STSS); short-term memory (STM) & long-term memory (LTM); interaction of memory with the perceptual process (selective attention).
• Describe strategies to improve both short-term memory storage (chunking) & long-term memory storage.
• Apply the memory process to the learning & performance of physical activities.

9. Reaction Time & Developing Effective Performance in Physical Activity
• Define reaction time, movement time and response time.
• Describe the impact of reaction time on performance.
• Explain factors affecting response time in practical activities .
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding & the application of theories relating to reaction time (the psychological refractory period (PRP), single-channel hypothesis, choice reaction time (Hick’s Law) and the role of anticipation).

10. Motor and Executive Programmes & Their Impact on the Learning of Movement Skills
• Describe the nature of, and give examples of, programmes stored in the long-term memory.
• Explain the links to Open Loop Control & the autonomous phase of learning.

11. Types of Motor Control & Their Impact on Movement Skill Acquisition & Competence in Physical Activity
• Describe open loop control; closed loop control.
• Explain the role of open loop & closed loop control in the performance of motor skills.
• Evaluate critically different types of feedback to detect & correct errors.
12. Joints: Movements & Muscles
• Wrist: flexion and extension; wrist flexors and extensors.
• Radio-ulnar: pronation and supination; pronator teres and supinator muscle.
• Elbow: flexion and extension; biceps brachii and triceps brachii.
• Shoulder: abduction, adduction, flexion, extension, rotation, horizontal flexion, horizontal extension, circumduction; deltoid, latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, subscapularis, infraspinatus, teres major and teres minor; trapezius; the role of the rotator cuff muscles, supraspinatus infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis.
• Spine (cartilaginous, gliding and pivot): flexion, extension, lateral flexion; rectus abdominus, external and internal oblique and the erector spinal group; sacrospinalis (the role of the transverse abdominus and multifidus in relation to core stability).
• Hip: abduction, adduction, flexion, extension, rotation illiopsoas, gluteus maximus, medius and minimus, adductor longus, brevis and magnus;
• knee: flexion and extension; biceps femoris, semi-membranosus , semi-tendinosus, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius and vastus medialis.
• Ankle: dorsi flexion, plantar flexion; tibialis anterior, soleus and gastrocnemius.





Informal tests at start of each lesson

Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resit tests
AP212. Schema Theory & Its Role in Developing Movement Skills & Strategies
• Explain relationships with the motor programme;
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of sources of information: recall schema (Knowledge of initial conditions; knowledge of response specification); recognition schema (knowledge of sensory consequences; knowledge of movement outcomes).
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of motor programmes (relevant sub-routines & possible schema identifies from the candidate’s physical activity experiences).

13. Motivation and Arousal and Their Impact on Young People’s Participation, Performance & Aspirations in Physical Activity
• Explain Drive Reduction Theory & its impact on a lifelong, balanced, active & healthy lifestyle.
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of arousal as a drive affecting levels of motivation.
• Explain motivation & arousal theories (Drive Theory, Inverted U Theory, Catastrophe Theory (Jones & Hardy)) & their application to the learning & performance of movement skills.
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of motivational strategies & their application (different ability levels, disaffected young people, encouraging participation in a balanced, active & healthy lifestyle).
• Evaluate critically motivation & arousal theories & the application of motivational strategies.

14. Theories Related to the Learning of Movement Skills and the Development of Positive Behaviours Associated with a Balanced, Active & Healthy Lifestyle
• The Associationalist/Connectionist Theory of Operant conditioning (Skinner).
• The cognitive theory related to the work of Gestaltists (Insight learning & ways of thinking to optimise learning).
• Social/observational learning theory; the importance of significant others in the adoption of a balanced, active & healthy lifestyle.
• Bandura’s model (demonstration, attention, retention, motor reproduction, matching performance), and the factors affecting modelling (nature & perceived importance of the model).

15. Reinforcement of Movement Skill Learning & Behaviours Associated with a Balanced, Active & Healthy Lifestyle
• Discuss positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement and punishment (with examples from candidate’s practical activities).
• Discuss Thorndike’s Laws; knowledge of methods of strengthening the stimulus-response (S-R) bond through repetition (Law of Exercise); satisfaction/annoyance/emotional intensity (Law of Effect); through physical and mental preparedness (Law of Readiness).
• Discuss appropriate use of reinforcement in skill learning & in promoting positive, healthy lifestyle behaviour.

16. Transfer of Learning to Develop Effectiveness in Physical Activity
• Discuss types of transfer that occur in practical performance: positive transfer; negative transfer; proactive transfer; retroactive transfer; bilateral transfer.
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of ways of optimising the effect of positive transfer.
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of ways of limiting the effect of negative transfer.
• Evaluate critically different types of transfer & their impact on the development of movement skills.
• Explain the effects of transfer of learning on schema development & the importance of variable practice.


17. Muscle Contractions and Muscle Fibre Types

• Explain concentric, eccentric and isometric contraction.
• Describe the structure and function of the different muscle fibre types (slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic and fast glycolytic) in relation to different types of physical activity.
• Explain how an individual’s mix of muscle fibre type might influence their reasons for choosing to take part in a particular type of physical activity.

18. Warm up & Cool down



• Analyse the effect of a warm up and cool-down on skeletal muscle tissue in relation to the quality of performance of physical activity.

19. The Impact of Different Types of Physical Activity on the Muscular and Skeletal Systems

• Evaluate critically the impact of different types of physical activity (contact sports, high impact sports and activities involving repetitive actions) on the skeletal and muscular systems (osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, growth plate, joint stability, posture and alignment) with reference to lifelong involvement in an active lifestyle.
20. Basic Concepts of Biomechanics

• Define Newton’s Laws of Motion.
• Describe the types of motion produced (linear, angular or general).
• Describe the effect of size of force, direction of the force and the position of application of force on a body.
• Define centre of mass;
• Explain the effect of changes in the position of the centre of mass and the area of support when applied to practical techniques.
• Carry out a practical analysis of typical physical actions.

Discussion of two practical assessments

Evaluation and appreciation of performance:
• Strengths and weaknesses
• Action Plan
• Benefits of participation
• Pathways
Informal tests at start of each lesson

Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits
AP31. Participation in Physical Activity
• Physical activity as an umbrella term (which might include physical & outdoor recreation, physical & outdoor education and/or sport).
• The meaning of the terms: Exercise; Healthy/Balanced lifestyles; Lifetime sport/Lifelong physical activity.
• The benefits of regular participation in physical activity.
• Factors contributing to increasingly sedentary lifestyles.
• Recommendations in terms of frequency, intensity & type of physical activity so as to develop, and sustain, a balanced, active & healthy lifestyle.
• Possible barriers to regular participation in physical activity by young people.

2. Physical Recreation & Outdoor Recreation
• Physical recreation (definitions; characteristics; benefits).
• Outdoor recreation as an aspect of physical recreation in the natural environment (characteristics; benefits).

3. Physical Education & Outdoor Education
• Physical Education (definitions; characteristics; benefits).
• Outdoor education as part of Physical Education in the natural (or semi-natural) environment (definitions; characteristics; benefits; adventure; risk (real vs. perceived) & safety; constraints on widespread regular participation by young people).

4. Sport
• Sport (definitions; characteristics; benefits).
• The terms: Physical prowess, physical endeavour, sportsmanship, gamesmanship, deviance.

5. The United Kingdom (UK)
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of surviving ethnic sports & games in the UK (e.g. Highland Games).
• Describe the characteristics of surviving ethnic sports & reasons for continued existence & popularity (including festival, local, traditional, isolation, social, tourism; annual; occasional; retention of ethnic identity).
• Explain the role of 19th Century public schools in promoting & organising sports & games.
• Explain the relatively recent move from the traditional amateur approach to a more professional approach (with reference to mass participation; sporting excellence; organisation & administration; government support) in sport.
6. The United States of America (USA)
• Describe characteristics of the USA (young, capitalist nation, relatively large population).
• Explain the nature of sport in the USA (win ethic; commercialism; vehicle for achieving ‘the American Dream’).
• Analyse the game of American Football (origins; nature of game including violence, commercialism).

7. Australia
• Describe characteristics of Australia (young nation, sparsely populated, colonial influence & immigration).
• Explain the nature of sport in Australia (social & cultural reasons for sport being a high status national pre-occupation).
• Analyse the game of Australian Rules Football (origins; factors that shaped its development, including commercialism & impact of media).

8. Response of the Cardiovascular system to Physical Activity

• Describe the link between the cardiac cycle (diastole and systole) and the conduction system of the heart.
• Describe the relationship between stroke volume, heart rate and cardiac output and resting values for each.
• Explain the changes that take place to stroke volume, heart rate and cardiac output during different intensities of physical activity.
• Explain the regulation of heart rate during physical activity (to include neural, hormonal and intrinsic factors).
• Describe the distribution of cardiac output at rest and during exercise (the vascular shunt mechanism).
• Explain the role of the vasomotor centre and the involvement of arterioles and pre-capillary sphincters;
• Explain how carbon dioxide and oxygen are carried within the vascular system; how effective transportation of carbon dioxide and oxygen within the vascular system aids participation in physical activity; how smoking affects the transportation of oxygen.
• Define blood pressure and identify resting values.
• Explain the changes that occur during physical activity and hypertension.
• Explain how venous return is maintained; the effects that a warm-up and cool-down period has on the cardiovascular system; how venous return affects the quality of performance.
• Evaluate critically the impact of different types of physical activity on the cardiovascular system (coronary heart disease (CHD); arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, angina, heart attack) with reference to lifelong involvement in an active lifestyle.

Discussion of two practical assessments

Evaluation and appreciation of performance:
• Strengths and weaknesses
• Action Plan
• Benefits of participation
• Pathways
Informal tests at start of each lesson

Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits

Draft evaluation and appreciation of performance
AP48. Funding of Physical Activity
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of public funding; private funding; voluntary funding (including the National Lottery).

9. Bodies Inflencing & Promoting Participation in Physical Activity as Part of a Balanced, Active & Healthy Lifestyle; The Promotion of Health, Fitness & Well-Being and/or Sporting Excellence
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of UK Sport;
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the United Kingdom Sports Institute (UKSI) and devolved National Institutes of Sport;
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of home country organisations (Sport England, Sports Council Northern Ireland, Sportscotland, Sports Council for Wales);
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of current government and national governing body initiatives
• Evaluate critically initiatives that have an impact on young people’s aspirations & their regular participation in physical activity in the UK.

10. Excellence & Participation in the UK
• Explain sports development (the sports development pyramid; continuum from mass participation to sporting excellence);
• Explain opportunity, provision and esteem (with reference to both participation in physical activity and the achievement of sporting excellence);
• Evaluate critically social and cultural factors that affect participation in physical activity and the achievement of sporting excellence by young people, the elderly, people with disabilities, women and ethnic minority groups;
• Describe possible measures to increase participation in physical activity & achievement of sporting excellence.
11. Performance Enhancing Products
• Explain the reasons for the use of drugs in sport;
• Describe the consequences of the use of drugs in sport (with particular reference to health, wellbeing and role modelling for young people);
• Describe possible solutions to the problem of the use of drugs in sport;
• Explain the impact on performance (s) in sport of modern technological products (with reference to particular products & activities).

12. Violence in Sport
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of violence in sport (players and spectators);
• Describe possible causes & solutions.

13. Sport, Sponsorship & the Media
• Explain the roles of the media (informing; educating; entertaining; advertising);
• Evaluate critically the impact of the media on sport (with particular reference to its role in promoting balanced, active and healthy lifestyles and lifelong involvement in physical activity);
• Explain the relationship between sport, sponsorship and the media (‘golden triangle’).

14. The Olympic Games
• Demonstrate knowledge & understanding of the background (vision of de Coubertin); principles; aims and philosophy of the modern Olympic movement; summer and winter format; International Olympic Committee (IOC) and British Olympic Association (BOA);
• Explain the commercialisation of the Olympics: pre- and post-1984 (Los Angeles);
• Describe the opportunities and implications for sport and society in the UK arising from 2012; (impact of being a host nation on sport and society; benefits and drawbacks including potential for increasing participation and promoting healthy lifestyles particularly among young people);
• Explain how the Olympic Games is a vehicle for nation building – E.g. China; the ‘Shop Window’ effect; government control & funding of sport; sport as a political tool.

15. Response of the Respiratory System to Physical Activity

• Describe the mechanics of breathing at rest and the respiratory muscles involved (including the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles).
• Explain the changes in the mechanics of breathing during physical activity including reference to additional muscles involved (sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis minor) and the active nature of expiration (internal intercostals and abdominal muscles).
• Explain how changes in the mechanics of breathing during physical activity are regulated by the respiratory centre (both neural and chemical control) to take into account the demands of different intensities of physical activity.
• Describe the process of gaseous exchange that takes place between the alveoli and the blood and between the blood and the tissue cells. (An awareness of partial pressure is required but candidates will not be expected to provide specific respiratory pressures.).
• Explain the changes in gaseous exchange that take place between the alveoli and the blood and between the blood and the tissue cells (increased diffusion gradient and accelerated dissociation of oxy-haemoglobin) as a direct result of participation in physical activity.
• Explain the effect of altitude on the respiratory system and how it influences the performance of different intensities of physical activity.
• Evaluate critically the impact of different types of physical activity on the respiratory system with reference to lifelong involvement in an active lifestyle (to include an awareness of asthma and smoking).
Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits

Second draft evaluation and appreciation of performance

PPE: Theory and practical

Moderation day
AP5Revision

Year 12 – OCR Technicals

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AutumnLearning Outcome 1: Know the roles and responsibilities of sports coaches and activity leaders
• Roles of sports coaches and activity leaders
•Responsibilities of sports coaches and activity leaders
•How the roles and responsibilities involved in teaching and delivering sport differ


Learning outcome 2:Understand principles which underpin coaching and leading
•Principles of leadership
• Attributes of coaches and leaders


•Learning outcome 1: Understand the skeletal system in relation to exercise and physical activity
-The axial and appendicular skeletons
-Appendicular skeleton
The functions of the skeleton and the link to types of bone
•Classifications of joints
•The types of synovial joint
•Structures and functions of synovial joints
•Joint movements
•Structure and function of the vertebral column
•The impact of physical activity, training and lifestyle on the skeletal system

Learning Outcome 3: Be able to use methods to improve skills, techniques and tactics in sport
•Methods for identifying strengths and weaknesses in skills, techniques and deployment of tactics
•Classification of skills and its links to types of practice
•Methods for measuring improvement in skills, techniques and deployment of tactics


Learning Outcome 4:
•Be able to plan sports and activity sessions
•Key considerations when planning sports/activity sessions
•SMART goal setting


Learning Outcome 2: Main muscles acting at synovial joints
•Types of muscle function
•Types of muscle contraction
•Structure and function of muscle fibre types
•Link between mix of fibre types and performance
•The impact of physical activity, training and lifestyle on the muscular system
Learners will need to consider a range of different roles involved in the coaching, teaching and delivery of sport and physical activity including coaches, coaching assistants, leaders and teachers. Learners must know what their roles and responsibilities are, how they differ from each other and how the different roles influence health and wellbeing outside of sports or activity sessions.


Coursework assessed tasks
Learners will consider the theoretical principles of being a coach or leader such as how teams and groups form and develop and how this can be influenced by the style and personality of the person leading or coaching them.


Written exam on the topics covered.

Learners must be able to demonstrate the different types of practice that are relevant to each of the skill classifications. For M2, learners will need to know different methods of measuring improvement and then be able to evaluate how effective the methods are for measuring development in the application of skills, techniques and tactics.


Coursework assessed tasks
Learners must plan a minimum of six sports or activity sessions which last a minimum of 30 minutes for a group of participants (i.e. at least two). These can be ‘one-off’ sessions in different sports or activities and do not need to demonstrate progression. Depending on the participants involved they can either be coached sports sessions or led activity sessions

Written exam on the topics covered.
SpringLearning Outcome 5: Be able to prepare sports and activity environments

•Preparing equipment for sports/activity sessions
•Preparing the environment for sports/activity sessions
•Assessing and minimising risks before sports/activity sessions
•Appropriate safeguarding policies and procedures

Learning Outcome 3
Understand the cardiovascular system in relation to exercise and physical activity
•The structures of the heart and their roles
•Stroke volume, heart rate and cardiac output
•Structure of blood vessels
•Components and functions of blood
•Vascular shunt mechanism and the role of arterioles and pre-capillary sphincters
•The impact of physical activity, training and lifestyle on the cardiovascular system

Learning Outcome 6: Be able to deliver sports and activity sessions
• Preparing participants for sport/activity sessions
•Delivering warm-up activities which are appropriate for the participants and session
•Delivering sport/activity sessions
•Concluding coaching sessions

Learning Outcome 4: Understand the respiratory system in relation to exercise and physical activity
•The structures of the lungs and their roles
•Respiratory muscles used during exercise
•The mechanics of breathing
•Gaseous exchange at the alveoli
•Tidal volume, breathing frequency and minute Ventilation
•The impact of physical activity, training and lifestyle on the respiratory system
Coursework assessed tasks
Learners will need to demonstrate that they can prepare a safe environment that is suitable for the planned sports or activity session and the participants that will be involved. Learners should undertake appropriate risk assessments and equipment checks, taking action to prevent hazards or reporting issues or concerns where necessary. Learners must also ensure that the appropriate safeguarding policies and procedures are in place. Learners should also ensure that the setup of the environment will minimise disruption during the sports or activity session.


Written exam on the topics covered.

Coursework assessed tasks
learners must deliver a minimum of six sports or activity sessions which last a minimum of 30 minutes to a group of participants (i.e. at least two). These can either be ‘one-off’ sessions in different sports or activities and do not need to demonstrate progression, or they can be progressive sessions. Depending on the participants involved they can either be coached sports sessions or led activity sessions. Learners must ensure that the warm ups are appropriate to the sports or activity session they are delivering and that the communication and motivation techniques they apply are appropriate to the participants, the sport or activity and the environment in which the session is taking place. Learners must then ensure that the sessions are brought to timely conclusions, include an appropriate cool down and offer the opportunity to both give and receive feedback.


Written exam on the topics covered.
SummerLearning Outcome 7: Be able to review sports and activity sessions
•Reviewing sport/activity sessions

Learning Outcome 5: Understand the different energy systems in relation to exercise and physical activity
• The three energy systems
•The energy continuum and how intensity and duration of exercise determines which energy system is predominant
•The recovery process for each energy system
Revision
Learners must consider feedback received following sports or activity sessions to evaluate whether they were successful and met the goals and targets set out in the initial plans
Coursework final assessment decisions made


Written exam on the topics covered.

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP11. Personality and its importance in effective performance and to following a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theories of personality: trait perspectives (the characteristics of extroversion/introversion, neuroticism/stability, Type A/Type B); social learning perspectives; interactionist approaches;
• explain the effects of personality profiling on the adoption of balanced, active and healthy lifestyles;
• evaluate critically personality profiling in sport

2. Attitudes and their influence on performance and lifestyles
• describe and explain the nature of attitudes, inconsistencies and prejudice in sporting situations;
• explain the origins of attitudes, and their influence on performance and lifestyles (including the effects of socialisation);
• describe the components of attitudes (cognitive, affective, behavioural);
• evaluate critically attitudes (and behaviour) in sport and lifestyle choice;
• describe methods of changing attitudes from negative to positive to promote participation in physical activity and a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concept of cognitive dissonance to change attitudes.

3. Motivation and it’s influence on performance and lifestyles
• Atkinson and McClelland’s theory of achievement motivation (need to achieve and need to avoid failure);
• sport-specific achievement motivation (eg competitiveness).

4. Attribution theory and the impact of attribution on performance and sustaining a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle
• discuss reasons for success and failure in physical activity;
• explain Weiner's model (locus of causality and stability dimensions);
• justify the use of attributional retraining;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of strategies for the promotion of mastery-orientation and the avoidance of learned helplessness; to raise self-esteem and to develop positive behaviours towards lifetime involvement in physical activity;
• Evaluate critically the effects of attribution theory on performance and on sustaining a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

5. Aggression and it’s impact upon performance and behaviour
• describe the nature of aggression and assertion;
• define channelled aggression;
• explain the causes of aggressive behaviour;
• evaluate critically theories of aggression (instinct theories; frustration-aggression hypothesis; aggressive-cue hypothesis (Berkowitz); social learning theories);
• describe methods of eliminating aggressive tendencies of performers and explain the effects of these methods on the adoption of active and healthy lifestyles.

6. Groups and teams – their impact upon performance and the pursuit of balanced, active and healthy lifestyles
• describe the nature of a group/team (mutual awareness, interaction, common goal);
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Steiner’s model of group performance (awareness of problems associated with productivity of a group/team);
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of motivational factors (social loafing); coordination/co-operation factors (Ringlemann effect) and explain the negative influences on behaviour that cause dysfunctional behaviour and avoidance of an active and healthy lifestyle;
• explain the factors affecting the formation and development of a cohesive group/team;
• explain the factors affecting participation in a group/team;
• explain group and team effects on behaviour (related to balanced, active and healthy lifestyles).
7. Leadership and the role of a leader in physical activities
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of effective leadership and explain its effects on lifestyle behaviour;
• describe the characteristics of leaders (autocratic/task-oriented; democratic/social-oriented; laissez-faire);
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of emergent and prescribed leaders;
• evaluate critically leadership theories (trait; social learning; interactionist theories);
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Chelladurai’s multi-dimensional model of leadership and explain the effect of leadership expectations on performance and the adoption of a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

8. Energy Concepts & Systems

Concepts

• Define energy (to include chemical, kinetic and potential), work and power and identify the units they are expressed in.



Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

• Explain the role of ATP; the breakdown and resynthesis of ATP; the principle of coupled reactions and exothermic and endothermic reactions.



ATP re-synthesis

• Explain the three energy systems: adenosine triphosphate phosphocreatine (ATP/PC) (alactic); the lactic acid system; the aerobic system; (to include the type of reaction (aerobic or anaerobic), the chemical or food fuel used, the specific site of the reaction, the controlling enzyme, energy yield, specific stages within a system, and the by-products produced).
• explain the contribution made by each energy system in relation to the duration and intensity of exercise.
Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits
AP28. Social facilitation and inhibition – the effects of an audience and other participants on performance and lifestyle behaviours
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the positive (facilitation) and negative (inhibition) effects (audience and co-actors) on performance, participation and lifestyle;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of links with levels of arousal, and the heightening of the dominant response (Zajonc);
• explain causes and effects of evaluation apprehension;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of strategies to combat the effects of social inhibition in practical activities (the use of selective attention and mental rehearsal) and in following a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

9. Goal setting – impact on performance and the development and sustaining of a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the importance and relevance of goal setting to sport (including participation, persistence and performance);
• explain factors affecting the setting of goals (‘SMARTER’ principle);
• evaluate critically the use of short/intermediate/long-term goals and process/performance/product goals to improve performance and participation in physical activity.

10. Self-confidence and its impact on performance, participation in physical activity and in raising self-esteem
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of sports confidence (Vealey), and the concepts of trait sports confidence, competitiveness orientation, and state sports confidence;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of self-efficacy (Bandura) explaining the influence of performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal;
• explain the effects self-efficacy on performance and in sustaining a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

11. Attentional control and its impact on effective performance
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of cue utilisation (Easterbrook) and explain the links with arousal;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of attentional styles (broad/narrow, internal/external - Nideffer).

12. Emotional control and its impact upon performance and in sustaining a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of activation and arousal and explain their relationship with personality, ability level and complexity of task;
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of peak flow experience and the zone of optimum functioning theory (Hanin);
• Describe the nature, and explain influences of, anxiety; state/trait distinction;
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of anxiety management techniques: cognitive techniques (mental rehearsal/imagery, positive self talk, thought stopping, rational/positive thinking) and somatic techniques (progressive muscular relaxation, biofeedback relaxation);
• Evaluate critically anxiety management techniques in improving performance, participation in physical activity and in sustaining a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

13. Energy Continuum, The Recovery Process & Aerobic Capacity

Energy Continuum

The Recovery Process



• identify the predominant energy system used related to the type of exercise (duration and intensity);
• explain the inter-changing between thresholds during an activity (eg the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA)); the effect of level of fitness, availability of oxygen and food fuels, and enzyme control on energy system used.



• Explain how the body returns to its pre-exercise state: the oxygen debt/excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); the alactacid and lactacid debt components (to include the processes that occur and the duration of each component); replenishment of myoglobin stores and fuel stores and the removal of carbon dioxide.
• Explain the implications of the recovery process for planning physical activity sessions (eg training intensities, work/relief ratios).

Aerobic capacity

• define aerobic capacity and explain how a performer’s VO2 max is affected by individual physiological make-up, training, age and sex.
• describe and apply methods of evaluating aerobic capacity (eg multi-stage fitness test, PWC170 test); candidates should assess their own VO2 max, comparing their result with the aerobic demands of their chosen activities;
• describe different types of training used to develop aerobic capacity (continuous running; repetition running; fartlek and interval training).
• explain the use of target heart rates as an intensity guide.
• describe the energy system and the food/chemical fuels used during aerobic work.
• explain the physiological adaptations that take place after prolonged periods of aerobic physical activity (eg an increase in stroke volume).
• plan a programme of aerobic training based on their own assessment of their aerobic capacity and the requirements of their activity.
Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits

Practical performance

Draft evaluation and appreciation of performance

AP38. Case Studies
For each case study activity candidates should be able to, with reference to the content specific to each activity:
• analyse the activity as popular recreation;
• assess the influence of 19th-century public schools on the development of the activity;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the activity as rational recreation;

9. Bathing and swimming
• Recreation; survival; health; initial development of competitive swimming.
• Swimming in the public schools: values and status.
• Bathing in urban industrial towns (Wash and Bath House Acts; hygiene and prevailing social conditions); the organisation of amateur swimming and formation of the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA).

10. Athletics
• Types and nature of activities associated with community events, rural sports, festivals, commercial fairs and wakes; view of the church; pedestrianism (its nature, development and status); the emergence of athletics.
• Athletics in public schools: hare and hounds; steeplechase; athletic sports days; values and status; influence of Exeter College, Oxford.
• The emergence of amateur athletics and opportunities for working class participation; amateurism, professionalism and the exclusion clause.
• Factors that have helped develop athletics in the UK and the impact of these factors on contemporary participation and performance.

11. Football
• Mob games.
• Football and rugby in public schools: values and status.
• Amateurism and professionalism; broken time payments; the split between association football and rugby football; spectatorism vs. participation and the importance of the game in urban communities.

12. Cricket
• Significance of class on participation.
• Cricket in public schools: values, status and organisation.
• William Clarke XI; amateurism and professionalism.

13. Tennis
• Real tennis as an exclusive, elitist pre-industrial activity.
• Tennis and other striking games in public schools: (fives, racquets, squash) their status and organisation.
• Lawn tennis as a middle class invention; tennis as a social occasion and as a vehicle for the emancipation of women and their participation in sport.

Strength & Flexibility
Strength

• Define types of strength (to include strength endurance, maximum strength, explosive/elastic strength, static and dynamic strength).
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of factors that affect strength (fibre type and cross sectional area of the muscle).
• Describe and apply methods of evaluating each type of strength (eg grip strength dynamometer).
• Describe and evaluate different types of training used to develop strength (the repetition, sets and resistance guidelines used to improve each type of strength); use of multi-gym, weights, plyometrics and circuit/interval training (with reference to work intensity; work duration; relief interval; number of work/relief intervals).
• Describe the energy system and the food/chemical fuels used during each type of strength training.
• Explain the physiological adaptations that take place after prolonged periods of physical activity (to include neural and physiological changes to skeletal muscle).
• Plan a programme of strength training based on their own assessment of their strength and the strength requirements of their activity.



Flexibility

• Define flexibility (to include static and dynamic flexibility).
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of factors that affect flexibility (type of joint; length of surrounding connective tissue).
• Describe and apply methods of evaluating flexibility (eg sit and reach test; goniometer (angle measure)).
• Describe different types of training used to develop flexibility (including static (active and passive), dynamic, ballistic and proproceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF)).
• Explain the physiological adaptations that take place after prolonged periods of physical activity (to include physiological changes to skeletal muscle and connective tissue).
• Plan a programme of flexibility training based on their own assessment of their flexibility and the flexibility requirements of their activity.
Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits
AP41. Popular Recreation in Pre-Industrial Britain & it’s Impact on Contemporary Participation & Performance
• describe characteristics (simple/natural; occasional; local; wagering; violence/cruelty; simple unwritten rules; courtly/popular; rural; occupational);
• explain social and cultural factors that influenced the nature and development of popular recreations;
• explain how popular recreation affected the physical competence and health of participants;
• describe the varying opportunities for participation;
• explain the impact of popular recreation on contemporary participation and performance;

2. Rational Recreation in Pre-Industrial Britain & it’s Impact on Contemporary Participation & Performance
• describe the characteristics of rational recreation (including respectability, regularity, regionalisation, codification, more controlled wagering) and an understanding of how these differed from the characteristics of popular recreation;
• explain how social and cultural factors influenced the nature and development of rationalised sports and pastimes with reference to:
• the industrial revolution and associated urban and agrarian revolutions;
• the emergence of an urban middle class;
• changes in work conditions that improved health and affected participation;
• increases in free time (Saturday half day and early closing movement) for industrial working class (a move towards more balanced, active and healthy lifestyles);
• the transport revolution and the impact of the railways (increased opportunity for participation and the development and spread of sport);
• changing views of the Church towards sport and recreation;
• amateurism and professionalism;
• the place and status of women in Victorian Britain; increased participation by middle-class women by the end of the 19th century;
• explain how rational recreation had an impact on the physical competence and health of participants;
• describe the varying opportunities for participation;
• explain the impact of rational recreation on contemporary participation and performance and compare participation then and now;


3. Nineteenth-century public schools and their impact on the development of physical activities and young people both then and now
• describe the characteristics (fee-paying; endowed; boys; boarding; gentry; non-local; controlled by trustees; spartan);
• explain the impact of 19th-century public schools on the development of case study activities with particular reference to participation and healthy lifestyles both then and now;

4. The developmental stages of athleticism in 19th-century public schools
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the three developmental stages of athleticism as a reflection of societal change and the civilising process;
• explain the evolving nature, status, organisation, technical development, social relationships and values of the schools and their sports and games through the stages;
• evaluate the influence of the three developmental stages of athleticism on the development of physical activities and young people both then and now;

5. Stage one (boy culture; bullying; brutality)
• explain the emergence of a sporting culture in individual schools as a result of activities brought in to schools by boys (melting pot) and the natural facilities available.

6. Stage two (Dr Arnold; social control)
• Explain the impact of Dr Thomas Arnold of Rugby School (1795–1842) as a reforming Headmaster (his aims, strategies, influence and impact);
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Muscular Christianity (definition and values).

7. Stage three (the ‘cult’ of athleticism)
• athleticism (definition and values);
• ‘melting pot’ influence of universities;
• the standardisation of rules;
• the role and impact of games-playing Oxbridge graduates returning to their schools;
• the influence of ex-public school boys on the spread of team games/rational recreations;
• reasons for the slower development of athleticism and regular participation in sports and games in girls’ public schools (as compared with boys’ public schools).
14. The 1902 Model Course
• describe objectives; content and methodology;
• explain reasons for implementation of the 1902 Model Course and the role of Colonel Malcolm Fox;

15. The 1933 Syllabus
• describe objectives; content; methodology; reputation;
• explain reasons for the replacement of the 1933 Syllabus.

16. The 1950s - Moving and Growing and Planning the Programme
• describe objectives; content and methodology (young people as independent decision-makers who should be encouraged to solve problems);
• explain the influence of World War II on the use of apparatus and the building of gymnasia, leading to increased involvement in, and effectiveness of, physical activity for young people.

17. 1970s and 1980s
• explain the impact of industrial action on opportunity and provision for young people to participate in physical activity in state schools as part of a lifelong involvement in a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle; impact on extra curricular activities;
• describe the aims of the National Curriculum for Physical Education;

18. Body Composition, Periodisation & Ergogenic Aids
Body composition

• Explain what is meant by body composition.
• Describe different methods of assessing body composition.
• Calculate the body mass index (BMI) of an individual.
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of basal metabolic rate (BMR) and the different energy requirements of different physical activities (use of metabolic equivalent/MET values).
• Estimate their daily calorific requirements (dietary/nutritional intake) based on their BMR and average additional energy consumption;
• Evaluate critically their own diet and calorie consumption.
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the health implications of being overweight or obese and how this affects involvement in physical activity.




Periodisation

• Define periodisation; macro, meso and micro cycles.
• Plan a personal health and fitness programme that will promote sustained involvement in a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle; the plan should include the principles of training.



Ergogenic aids

• Explain the positive and negative effects of each type of aid together with the type of performer who would benefit from its use;
• Identify the legal status of each type of aid;
• Evaluate critically the use of ergogenic aids in order to be able to make informed decisions about their use.
• Aids considered should include:
• Use of dietary manipulation, pre-/post-competition meals/supplements and food/fluid intake during exercise;
• Use of creatine supplements and human growth hormone;
• Gene doping;
• Blood doping and recombinant erythropoietin (Rh EPO);
• Use of cooling aids to reduce core temperature and aid recovery;
• Use of training aids to increase resistance, eg pulleys; parachutes;
• Other aids can be considered and candidates should already have prior knowledge of the effects of alcohol, caffeine and anabolic steroids.
Exam question at end of each lesson

Half-term test & resits

Second draft evaluation and appreciation of performance

PPE
AP5Revision


Psychology

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1PY1 - perspectives, cognitive and behaviouralExam qu) PY1 cognitive and behavioural question 1 to 5 from exam paper
AP2PY1 - perspectives, biological and psychodynamicExam qu) PY1 biological and psychodynamic question 1 to 5 from exam paper
AP3PY2 core studies - first five core studiesPy2 exam questions 1-6 which cover all ten studies
AP4PY2 core studies - nextfive core studiesPPE exams: PY1 whole paper
AP5Going over all of spec PY1 and PY2Whole practice papers (PY1 and PY2)
AP6Introduce PY4 Forensic psychologyTwo essay questions on Forensic psychology

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

100% Exams (40% PY1, 60% PY2=AS)

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1PY4 Forensic psychologyThree essays Forensic psychology
AP2PY4 AbnormalityFive essays on Abnormality
AP3PY4 The UnconsciousFive essays on the Unconscious
AP4PY4 ControversiesFive essays on controversies and PPE exams: PY4 half the paper
AP5PY3 Research methodsExam questions on PY3 whole exam paper PY3 and second half of PY4 exam paper

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

100% Exams (40% PY3, 60% PY4)


Travel & Tourism

Year 12

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 1: Investigating the Travel + Tourism sectorTask 1 Component Industries and their organisations
Task 1 The Roles of travel and tourism organisations
Task 3 Interdependencies
Task 4 The development of travel and tourism
Task 5 Sectors and Trends
AP2Unit 1 Investigating the Travel + Tourism sector
Unit 3 The Uk as a destination
Task 1 Tourist Destinations
Task 2 Needs of inbound vistors
Task 3 How visitors are attracted to UK
Task 4 Factors affecting UK inbound + outbound tourism
Task 5 The UK as a destination
AP3Unit 1 Investigating the Travel + Tourism sector
Unit 3 The Uk as a destination
As AP1 + AP2
AP4Unit 3 The Uk as a destination +
Unit 4 Customer service in Travel and Tourism
Task 1: Importance of Customer Service
Task 2: Customer service Provision
Task 3: What are Customer Service skills
Task 4: Demonstrating Customer Service Skills
Task 5: Demonstrating Selling Skills
AP5Unit 4 Customer service in Travel and TourismTask 1: Importance of Customer Service
Task 2: Customer service Provision
Task 3: What are Customer Service skills
Task 4: Demonstrating Customer Service Skills
Task 5: Demonstrating Selling Skills

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

3 units – controlled assessment

Year 13

 Curriculum contentAssessed work
AP1Unit 2 The Business of Travel and Tourism
Task 1 The Business environment in Travel and Toursim
Task 2 Organisations and their financial characteristics
Task 3 Business aims and competitive advantage
Task 4 Producing a Business Case
AP2Unit 6 Preparing for employment in Travel + Tourism
Task 1 Career opportunities within Travel + Tourism
Task 2 Roles and responsibilities of 2 jobs in T+T
Task 3 Stages of recruitment
Task 4 Personal Skills audit
Task 5 Role play in recruitment and selection process
Task 6 Factors that contributye to an effective workplace.
AP3Unit 2 The Business of Travel and Tourism
Unit 6 Preparing for employment in Travel + Tourism
As AP1 + AP2
AP4Unit 6 + 7 European Destinations
Task 1 Review and research leisure destinations within Europe
Task 2 Specific holidays and the destinations
Task 3 Factors and features that determine the appeal of 2 leisure destinations for different types of visitors
Task 4 Review factors to 1 declining and 1 thriving destination
AP5Unit 7 European Destinations
Task 1 Review and research leisure destinations within Europe
Task 2 Specific holidays and the destinations
Task 3 Factors and features that determine the appeal of 2 leisure destinations for different types of visitors
Task 4 Review factors to 1 declining and 1 thriving destination

The components for the final assessment level are as follows:

3 units – controlled assessment